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Blah blah intro to this place. To be composed later.

Basic French, INCOMPLETE


Jun 19 2007, 10:20 PM (Post #1)
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ATTN: This is a very first drafty sort of thing, I'll add fancier codes later, with italicizing/bolding for pronunciation etc.
Unless given a special request, I'm just going to do a little bit each day in order. Accents to be added soon.


This is not at all a "travel" french guide or phrasebook--- my aim really is to get you to learn to speak-- or at least write, since pronunciation is hard to teach w/out sounds-- French.
I am the "French wizard" at my high school, named by the teacher as the best non-native speaker she's ever had. (Not to brag) I know what I am doing. This is my fourth year of French. At my teacher's recommendation, I even skipped a level, enabling to me to take AP French earlier.

We'll start at the beginning, the way I learned. Feel free to respond or PM me with suggestions of how to clear this up or with any question about French!

Introduction to French



In French, there are pronouns, just like in English.
je = I (note that "je" is not capitalized unless at the beginning of a sentence)
tu = you (singular or informal, we'll get to this later)
il/elle/on = he/her/one (some use "on" rather than "nous" for "we" informally)
nous = we
vous = you (plural or formal, we'll get to this later)
ils/elles = them (at least one boy present/all girls) yeah, it's a sexist language

All other parts of speech are also in French. However, sentence structure is different. (structure/grammar covered later)

As in English, different verbs in French are conjugated differently depending on the subject of the sentence. We'll begin with the most basic verb.

ETRE = TO BE
je suis = I am
tu es = you are
il/elle/on est = he/she/one is
nous sommes = we are
vous etes = you are
ils/elles sont = they are

Not all verbs are conjugated so erratically. Most follow patterns. The majority of verbs in French are "-er" verbs. That is, they end in "er." Not all verbs that end this way follow the pattern, however. There always exceptions, but don't let this bog you down so early on! Here's a true "-er" verb. All true "-er" verbs have the same endings added in place of the "-er."

REGARDER = TO WATCH
je regarde
tu regardes
il/elle/on regarde
nous regardons
vous regardez
ils/elles regardent

All of the above endings are silent, with the exception of "ons" (pronounced on)and "ez," (pronounced ay) Many groups of letters in french, like "ent" look like they make a sound but are almost always silent. You'll get used to it. I suggest looking at one of many websites w/ sound to get proper pronunciations. I'll add a link later.

Here are some more useful -er verbs that are conjugated the same way as "regarder" with e, es, e, ons, ez, and ent endings that replace the er according to the subject. Single objects and names are conjugated with like "il/elle/on" with e, and multiple objects and names are conjugated like "ils/elles" with ent
AIMER - to like/love
HABITER - to live
MARCHER - to walk
PARLEZ - to talk
ECOUTER - to listen to
TRAVAILLER - to work
ARRIVER - to arrive




MORE TO COME

This post has been edited by Roger Smith: Aug 20 2007, 06:07 AM
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Jun 19 2007, 10:58 PM (Post #2)
Here for the cute boys ;)
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Go to Google and find something on accents. It's a bunch of CTRL/SHIFT functions.
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Jun 19 2007, 11:04 PM (Post #3)
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Thank you. I did and I got a bunch of combinations. Silly of me not to have googled it. I assumed there was maybe bb code or something that was exclusive to forum text. I'll get back to updating this soon.
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Aug 20 2007, 04:58 AM (Post #4)
Well why can't we do the shuffle?!
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I have to thank you for this, keep it up please. I was just informed, not long ago, that I have to take a proficiency exam in french and I havent spoken it in three years.
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Aug 20 2007, 05:07 AM (Post #5)
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Nice submission. French sounds pretty damn similar to the spanish I learned in 2 summer sessions o_o. (a 6 week course and two 2 week courses). If you are planning on submitting more, it might be wise to separate them into distinct sections/lessons/chapters/etc.
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Aug 20 2007, 05:10 AM (Post #6)
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Well, I hope I can help you, but it's going to be really hard to teach a lot without an audio guide of some kind. Is it just written? I'll do my best. I'm starting a new wave of updating now that I've finished my summer French work (to skip that level) and won't be distracted by it. I expect this to be very comprehensive when I'm done, but I can break from what I planned to tailor it to what you need... what do you need? How soon?
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Aug 20 2007, 05:18 AM (Post #7)
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I don't exactly need anything; it's just that I'm curious. Many of my friends took French (instead of Japanese, which I already knew from my stay in Japan and also took at school, and Spanish, which I took in the summer) as their language in high school. I just thought it'd be great to be aware of at least the basics.

Are you french in ethnicity? I thought you were more Russian?
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Aug 20 2007, 05:46 AM (Post #8)
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Oh, sorry, I didn't even see your first post here. I was responding to Nesticles' post, who needs to take a proficiency exam. Yes, I have planned for distinct chapters to be coming. Each will begin with a vocabulary list, followed by a few new verbs that go along with the vocabulary and then some other grammar things, such as tenses, articles, etc. Each chapter will have a theme, like "At the bank" "Driving" "Cooking" or "At the airport/train station" (trains are big in Europe.) I'm only Russian a few generations back on my dad's side, I'm pretty much all German (Austrian) and Polish. Due to the proximity of my family's whereabouts to the Alsacien border, I'm pretty much French also.
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Aug 20 2007, 06:34 AM (Post #9)
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Oh, that's exactly how I learned spanish. I had a book with 15 chapters, and each had a theme, 50-150 vocab words/phrases, and 4 sections on new grammatical rules or verb conjugations
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Aug 20 2007, 12:32 PM (Post #10)
Here for the cute boys ;)
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French and Spanish are romance languges. Portugese is also very similar to Spanish.
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Aug 20 2007, 05:48 PM (Post #11)
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That's right, all Romance languages are very similar in their structure and thus are taught similarly. The five living Romance languages that I was told exist (I've never checked it, I ought to) are Portuguese, Spanish, French, Italian, and Romanian. Spanish and Italian are so similar, that a Spanish person and an Italian person can speak and understand each other relatively well.
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Aug 21 2007, 12:08 AM (Post #12)
Here for the cute boys ;)
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More or less, all 5 of those people can talk and understand each other.
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Aug 21 2007, 12:13 AM (Post #13)
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Yes, if it stays basic, especially since European people generally do know at least a little bit of some other languages... unlike most single-minded Americans.
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Aug 21 2007, 12:16 AM (Post #14)
Here for the cute boys ;)
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I'm glad I am part of multiple cultures in America because of this.
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Aug 21 2007, 12:22 AM (Post #15)
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Multiculturalness is good. I'll add more to this article tonight.
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